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20121107
20121107
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from the races in montana, nevada, and north dakota. mark halpern, if we go back to the top of that list, elizabeth warren versus scott brown, tight all the way. what did elizabeth warren do in the end to win? >> she ran as a democrat in a state where the president won by a big margin. >> that helps. >> very difficult. they knew if the president won by 20 seats or more, it will be difficult to overcome. she made very few mistakes. and now she'll become one of the leading voices in the senate for progressives around the country. >> what does she bring to the senate? >> she brings that passion. and from a real liberal left perspective in terms of economic issues. she is a consumer advocate. she will be aligned with bernie sanders the independent and several others on that side of the spectrum. she may make it very difficult for some of the regulators who are trying to do bank legislation and go along with business as usual. i think she will be a very strong voice. she has that spirit. she's proved she can be independent. she's not really reliant on any sources. i think brown w
nevada. and mika, back east in pennsylvania, a state that one poll had deadlocked over the weekend, we found out it wasn't really deadlocked, was it, now? >> no. >> that was a lie! >> the romney campaign tried to make an 11th hour push there. obama was declared the winner in pennsylvania fairly early in the night. >> and the one battleground state mitt romney did win last night was north carolina, a state that the president took in 2008. and where democrats held their conventions this summer. but this morning the president's also pulling ahead. and this is very important for the white house and a lot of people would say for the way we govern over the next four years. the president's pulling ahead in the popular vote. currently leading nationwide 50%-48%. >> aside from the race for the white house, get this. republicans who had hoped to win control of the senate last night, they were hoping for it, but it was democrats who were able to flip several seats in their favor. we're going to go over all of those a little later. democrats now hold 51 senate seats to republicans' 45 with races i
of nevada. he beat romney by five points in new hampshire, the state romney's family spends his summers. late last night virginia was called in the president's favor. and more than hurricane sandy, the employment rate, or even the auto bailout what proved decisive was cold, hard demographics. as the obama campaign predicted more than a year ago the white portion of the electorate would drop and it dropped from 74% to 72% in 2012. the president may have won just 39% of white voters but he carried nearly eight in ten nonwhite voters including a whopping 93% of african-americans. 71% of had a tinos, and 73% of asian voters. and despite all the predictions young voters wouldn't turn out, they made up a higher percentage of the electorate than they did four years ago. that's right. a higher percentage of the electorate. romney also fell short on the issue which was supposed to be his calling card for office and which voters picked as their top concern, the economy. nearly as many said the president would be the best to better handle the economy. 49%/48% there. and they picked the president o
in the electorate. if you look at states like nevada and colorado, and virginia specifically northern virginia, and florida along the i-4 corridor, the changes to the electorate are facing the republican party in a stark way. president bush realized this and michael and his team and there was significant outreach to the latino community in understanding that the party needed to evolve in that direction. some of those lessons were lost and the devicesive ideological primary that mitt romney made, proposed the dream act to beat rick perry has cost him in the election. there will be that conversation and a loud conversation in the republican party but look, that's what elections do. they teach you lessons. i think michael is right, the party will have that conversation internally and i believe they will be competitive moving forward because they don't have a choice. >> go ahead. >> i think it's a one-sided conversation because if you get 27% of the hispanic vote, you cease to be a national party moving forward. i think most smart republicans will get that. there will be disagreement on how you re
the senate and fell short with candidates in colorado, chris o'donnell in delaware and sharon angle in nevada. then this year, look, if you didn't have the anomalies in missouri and indiana and candidates felt the need to explain their positions on rape and never a good plan in politics, much less just in social conversation -- >> in life. >> in life, yeah. i mean, but even if you tossed those out you are talking about a senate to otherwise be exactly what it was the day before. >> remarkable. >> i think republicans fall in to a trap looking at when's going on in the senate and don't sense a problem in terms of not just messaging but candidate selection. there's a problem of washington republicans in that they have lost the ability to push for the candidates they want in states. there's a backlash against that and need to find a way to connect with their grassroots and find candidates acceptable to the grass roots and competitive. >> absolutely. >> quickly, one thing on the martinez, rubio thing, you're right but it's more than a couple people on the stage and having the policies that want to
% of that vote. latinos were key in battleground states like colorado, nevada, and virginia. joining me now is latino contributor and usa today columnest raul reyes. i know it's been a long night. thanks for being here with me this morning. >> my pleasure. >> let's get into this. there was a huge turnout and it's something the president had courted his campaign went after aggressively and it worked. what does it mean now over the next four years the fact that vote showed up for him. what type of promises should be delivered upon. >> in terms of showing up, i can tell you the latino community, hispanics on all sides of the political spectrum are so excited and energized. not only by the outcome of the election but this is our time when people wanted us to show up to be there and come to the polls and we did. we're in line with projections. so that is a huge step for us. our community has been often been called the sleeping giant. we're awake now. we are here. but going forward, obama has a tremendous challenge. because he has admitted that immigration reform was his greatest failure in his f
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6